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Pork Tenderloin Stuffed with Spinach, Roasted Bell Pepper, Mushroom, and Parmesan

Pork Tenderloin Stuffed with Spinach, Roasted Bell Pepper, Mushroom, and Parmesan

by Pam on December 10, 2013

I had a pork tenderloin in the refrigerator to use up so I went in search of ingredients that I could stuff it with. I found some fresh spinach, roasted bell peppers, a few mushrooms, fresh basil, and some Parmesan cheese. I sliced the pork tenderloin nearly in half then pounded it thin. I seasoned the meat then layered on the ingredients before rolling it up and searing it in a hot pan. I baked it in the oven and it turned out beautifully! The pork was really tender and the stuffing added so much flavor to the meat. My kids ate all of their portions so I take that as a good sign. My husband and I both thought it was delicious. I served this stuffed tenderloin with some green beans and the Creamy Garlic and Parmesan Mashed Potatoes[1] for a delicious meal.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Place the pork tenderloin on a cutting board. Trim any fat from the meat then remove the silverskin (click here for instructions[2]). Using a very sharp knife make a lengthwise cut down the center of the pork tenderloin, cutting to but not through the other side. Spread the meat open and place a piece of  plastic wrap over the top. Working from the center to the edges, pound lightly with the flat side of a meat mallet to form a rectangle.

Stir together chopped spinach, mushrooms, roasted bell pepper, basil, panko crumbs, minced garlic, and Parmesan cheese in a bowl. Season the pork tenderloin with sea salt and freshly cracked pepper, to taste then spread the spinach mixture evenly over the pork.

Roll up jelly-roll style. Use toothpicks to seal together. Season the pork with sea salt and freshly cracked pepper, to taste.

Heat the olive oil in an OVEN PROOF skillet over medium high heat. Place the stuffed pork tenderloin in the pan and cook for 4-5 minutes or until golden brown. Flip the pork over and place into the oven for 25-30 minutes or until the pork reaches an internal temperature of 160 degrees. Remove from the oven and let the meat rest for at least 5 minutes before slicing and serving. Enjoy.



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Pork Tenderloin Stuffed with Spinach, Roasted Bell Pepper, Mushroom, and Parmesan




Yield: 6

Prep Time: 10 min.

Cook Time: 30 min.

Total Time: 30-40 min.



Ingredients:

1 pork tenderloin, silver skin removed
Sea salt and freshly cracked pepper, to taste
1 cup of baby spinach leaves, chopped
4-5 button mushrooms, chopped
2 tbsp roasted bell pepper, chopped
3-4 fresh basil leaves, chopped
2 tbsp panko crumbs
1 tbsp Parmesan cheese, finely grated
1 small clove garlic, minced
1 tbsp olive oil

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Place the pork tenderloin on a cutting board. Trim any fat from the meat then remove the silverskin (click here for instructions). Using a very sharp knife make a lengthwise cut down the center of the pork tenderloin, cutting to but not through the other side. Spread the meat open and place a piece of plastic wrap over the top. Working from the center to the edges, pound lightly with the flat side of a meat mallet to form a rectangle.

Stir together chopped spinach, mushrooms, roasted bell pepper, basil, panko crumbs, minced garlic, and Parmesan cheese in a bowl. Season the pork tenderloin with sea salt and freshly cracked pepper, to taste then spread the spinach mixture evenly over the pork. Roll up jelly-roll style. Use toothpicks to seal together. Season the pork with sea salt and freshly cracked pepper, to taste.

Heat the olive oil in an OVEN PROOF skillet over medium high heat. Place the stuffed pork tenderloin in the pan and cook for 4-5 minutes or until golden brown. Flip the pork over and place into the oven for 25-30 minutes or until the pork reaches an internal temperature of 160 degrees. Remove from the oven and let the meat rest for at least 5 minutes before slicing and serving. Enjoy.



Recipe and photos by For the Love of Cooking.net

References

  1. ^ Creamy Garlic and Parmesan Mashed Potatoes (www.gordon-ramsay-recipe.com)
  2. ^ click here for instructions (www.learninghowtocook.com)
  3. ^ Print Recipe (www.gordon-ramsay-recipe.com)
  4. ^ Save to ZipList Recipe Box (www.gordon-ramsay-recipe.com)

22 ways to cook horse meat – Italian Cuisine


Slim, rich in iron (more than twice as much as beef), tasty and sweet. Horse meat is an ingredient that should not be underestimated, especially if you are looking for new flavors. And since it is present in the diet of sportsmen and growing boys, we can consider it in all respects a noble and precious food for our health. And although for some people buy horse meat from the butcher is a habit, many still say that they have never tasted it. Here then we come into play, with many good ideas and some guidelines to approach a first consumption.

But before focusing on the perfect recipes to learn about and enhance horse meat, let's review the basic rules to enjoy it to the fullest.

1 – Watch out for cooking

As we said before, we are dealing with a very lean meat that requires cooking that does not dry it. The ideal is therefore to opt for a typical consumption blood steak or even raw (it is very appreciated as a base for jokes, carpaccio and tartare). If you want to focus on longer cooking, on the other hand, it is preferable to rely on wet preparations such as stews and rolls with sauce.

2- Fillet inspiration

To understand how to treat horse meat, we can refer to cooking which is reserved for valuable and delicate parts such as beef fillet. The slice of horse meat in question will need to be two to three inches thick and put in the oven at 180 ° C for 5 minutes per side. We will then pass it in a pan with a knob of butter to finish cooking and give flavor, enriching to taste with sage leaves.

3- Lean, but not too much

Horsemeat is practically devoid of fatty parts, the same that usually melt in a pan avoiding burning. So if we love the scalped and greedy effect of certain preparations, a small amount of fat will have to be added. Yes in butter, to which to combine perhaps whole grains of pepper, but it is oil is also perfect with which we will continue to wet our meat during cooking, recovering it from the corners of the tilted pan.

Our recipes

And now … let's cook! In the gallery below you will find preparations such as morsels cooked in Barbera, meatballs, braised meats, ribs, stews, hamburgers and delicious pasta dishes. Well 22 recipes to try and try again without hesitation.

Chunks of horse with Barbera
Horse meatballs
Braised horse with chestnuts
Horse ribs with tomato sauce
Horse stew with white wine and Apulian artichokes
Wet horse with spring onions
Horse paprika moist
Braised horse with vegetables
Stuffed horse spinach
Horse sirloin with black pepper
Potato ravioli with horse sauce
Horse burger
Basket of noodles with leeks and horse frays
Guitar pasta with horse sauce
Horse fillet with potatoes
Horse stew
Horse carpaccio with ricotta
Fennel, celeriac and horse frays
Horse escalopes in aromatic sauce
Horse carpaccio with sour vegetables
Orecchiette with braciolette sauce
Horse tartare with lime

Read also

The best butcher shops (and the best butchers) in Italy

Read also

Sausages from all over Italy, unite

WE COOKED FOR YOU

Chunks of horse with Barbera

WE COOKED FOR YOU

Horse meatballs

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Braised horse with chestnuts

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Horse ribs with tomato sauce

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Horse stew with white wine and Apulian artichokes

WE COOKED FOR YOU

Wet horse with spring onions

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Braised horse with vegetables

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Stuffed horse spinach

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Potato ravioli with horse sauce

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Horse burger

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Horse fillet with potatoes

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Horse stew

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Horse carpaccio with ricotta

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Fennel, celeriac and horse frays

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Horse escalopes in aromatic sauce

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Horse carpaccio with sour vegetables

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Orecchiette with braciolette sauce

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Horse tartare with lime

Which extra virgin olive oil should be used for meat? – Italian Cuisine


Extra virgin olive oils that best accompany beef, sheep and pork. Recommended by our expert depending on the cooking

Red meats require well-structured oils, with much, much character: for example, those with medium to intense fruitiness and with very pronounced spikes of bitterness and pungency.
Usually this category of extra virgin is identified with those of Central Italy, Tuscan in the lead, or of the South, Puglia in particular.
Right, but only in part because it is not only the territory of origin that determines the characteristics of an oil and its flavor, but also the variety of olives from which it is obtained.

Here are those that, taking into account their origin, better enhance the individual preparations.
Good extra virgin olive oils with cattle
Beef and beef have a rather intense taste. On a base already rich in flavor it is therefore necessary to use equally tasty oil. It gives a greater palatability and a general sense of pleasantness to the use of an extra virgin olive oil with a robust character, rich in fruity and savory notes.

Good ones with roasts

Sicilian oils are excellent from cerasuola olives, but if the meat is marinated before being cooked, those from nocellara del Belice or tonda iblea are fine because they are savory and fragrant, able to better balance the taste of the preparation.

Escalopes (or slices)

They want fruity and fragrant oils like the Tuscan ones from the frantoio or moraiolo cultivar. If cooked with pizzaiola, with tomato, or with pepper, the Pugliesi of Salento are exceptional with coratina olives or cellina di Nardò. Tartare: the lean meat minced beef with anchovies, onion, capers, parsley and yolk and seasoned with lemon, salt and pepper wants a drizzle of oil, which should be of medium fruity like the Abruzzese from Loreto olives. Ribs: either grilled or grilled, they are accompanied by a medium fruity flavor, better still the Molise or Gargano oil from rosciola or peranzana olives.

Boiled

Still steaming it goes close to the intense fruity of the Barese from coratina olives, intensely herbaceous and very bitter and spicy; if it is served cold in salads or with sauces (for example with thyme), well also those from Umbria with moraiolo or Sicilians from nocellara del Belice. Stracotto alla fiorentina: perfect in this case a regional combination. Therefore, choose a Florentine oil from the oil mill triad

Overcooked At Fiorentina

Perfect in this case a regional combination. To be chosen therefore a Florentine oil of the triad frantoio, moraiolo and leccino, rather intense and sapid, bitter, with peaks of astringency. With pork, savory with judgment

Pork, although tasty, can contain less intense oils

With the ribs

If flavored with orange juice, they are a delight accompanied with a Sicilian extra virgin olive oil from Moorish olives, a Trieste oil from bianchera olives or a Sardinian variety of Bosana. For those with anchovies or olives, both Veneto and Lombardy medium-sized oils are good, obtained from Casaliva or Gargna cultivars.

With fillet and loin

They are the leanest cuts and for them both medium intensity fruity oils and those with a decidedly more intense and marked character are good. The difference comes from the type of cooking and the seasonings used: as a rule, the longer the first and the tastier the seconds, the greater the intensity of the oil used must be.

On the livers

Wrapped in the pork net and then baked in the oven, they require an oil with an intense flavor and a compact consistency like those of the Tuscan Maremma from olive Seggianese olives

For the kid, better little oil but with personality

Less savory than that of mutton but more than that of lamb, kid meat is nevertheless rich in taste and quite fatty, so the oil to be used must be little but very fruity and sapid, with a penetrating taste that pinches into throat. Particularly if, as often happens, it is marinated before cooking, the oil from Bari with pure coratina olives and the moraiolo of Umbria prove to be excellent. The grilled ribs are an exception: in this case it is better to use an extra virgin olive oil from Lazio from Itrana olives, with an intense fruitiness. It should be noted that the kid is often prepared according to regional recipes: in this case the suggestion is to also use local oils

Luigi Caricato – Number 11 November 2008