Tag: knife

How to Debone & Butterfly a Leg of Lamb for Fun and Profit

As promised, here’s the video for how to debone and butterfly your own leg of lamb. Since I am going to save you a few dollars, when the butcher asks you if you want it deboned, I’d appreciate it if you said something like, “I watch Food Wishes, so I’ve got it covered.” By the way, I was only half kidding about using a fat, dull knife

Bored cooks have been known to do this with butter knives, steak knives, pairing knives, or any other knife they think would win them an after shift beer (I’ve heard from a friend). The point is, cooks drink a lot, and you don’t need a razor-sharp blade to do this at home. So, if you’re doing a whole leg of lamb this Easter, I hope you give this simple technique a try. Have a great holiday, and as always, enjoy!


Sushi for obsessives

This is why you need to wipe your knife between roll cuts. Notice how I have focused on the only clean one

Up until very recently I laughed at people who made their own sushi. There are some things that are best left to the experts, is my view – and sushi is one of them.

Then my raging pregnancy craving for sushi got quite out of control. It’s all I want to eat, ever. It’s all I can really stomach eating. I don’t really mean actual raw fish, although that will do, I really mean cut rolls, maki rolls – California rolls, spicy tuna rolls – even vegetarian rolls. I don’t care. I’m not fussy. I just want fucking sushi. I am an addict.

Even my Japanophile husband is getting a bit alarmed by it all, especially when we went out to a robata (a Japanese grill, where they cook tiny things on skewers – really delicious) and refused to eat anything except sushi.

But I can only squeeze a trip out for sushi out of him about once a fortnight or he starts getting bored with it, so I’ve had to come up with ways of filling in the gaps between my professional sushi hits. I stopped short at the Japanese sundries section of Waitrose the other day, dithered for a moment, then held out my arms, and swept the whole lot off the shelves and into my trolley: sushi mat, nori paper, wasabi, sushi rice, sushi rice seasoning. Then I wheeled back to the vegetable aisle and bought a cucumber, then I wheeled over to the fish section and bought some cooked, peeled prawns.

And I will say this: homemade sushi is actually pretty good. It’s not that hard to do and doesn’t make much of a mess – all you need to cook is the rice and everything else is just an assembly job – I can see if you did it reasonably often you’d get very good at all that rolling.

My problem is with the rice – although I’ve never been good at cooking rice, I’m hoping that results will come with practice. The two times I’ve cooked it now it comes out a bit overcooked and means a slight mushiness in the resultant roll. I now wonder if this might not be because of actual overcooking but allowing the rice to soak for more than the advised 30 minutes prior to boiling.

If you are going to make homemade sushi, then obviously the thing to do is look up a tutorial on YouTube, that is the only way to see properly how to do it, but I also offer the following additional notes:

1 When you cover your sushi mat with cling film, tuck the ends of the film in under the mat, to stop the film ending up getting rolled up inside the sushi, which is not the idea at all.

2 Sushi rice is like fucking concrete. Do not allow it, as I did, to sit in sieves, pots, on knives or sushi mats for more than a few minutes because it wil lliterally superglue itself to any unguarded thing – it’s mental.

3 Do wipe your knife on a wet cloth inbetween cuts of your sushi roll as it will make it all look so nice; if you don’t, little bastard grains of rice will stick to the knife and then stick to the next roll of sushi and look all messy (see photo above).

4 Be generous with your sushi rice seasoning. Plain old rice is awfully boring and I have found that the directions on the back of the seasoning bottle don’t allow for enough.

The Perfect Soft Boiled Egg

The Perfect Soft Boiled Egg

by Pam on May 23, 2013

The older I get the more I love eggs – especially over easy, poached, or soft boiled.  I recently realized that I had never made a soft boiled egg as an adult but I remember my mom making them them a lot when I was younger. She would boil the egg then add a dab of butter, salt, and pepper into a small dish before peeling the egg and putting it into the dish and mixing it all up. I remember dipping my toast into the perfectly cooked egg mixed with the butter and I LOVED it! I decided to try making a soft boiled egg and after a few attempts I think I have found the way to make a perfect soft boiled egg. The whites are cooked but the yolk is still runny. I serve it on buttered toast and it is absolutely delicious.

Heat an inch of water in a small saucepan over medium high heat until boiling. Add the egg, reduce the heat to medium, and cover with a lid. Let the egg cook for 6 minutes then remove it from the stove. Side Note: if you are using a jumbo sized egg, cook for 6 minutes & 30 seconds. Run the saucepan and egg under cold water until the egg is cool enough to be handles. Using a knife, crack the top edge of the egg then gently peel, making sure to be careful so you don’t puncture the egg. Once it is peeled, place on a piece of buttered toast, slice down the center with a knife, season with sea salt and freshly cracked pepper, to taste then dig in. Enjoy!



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The Perfect Soft Boiled Egg




Yield: 1

Cook Time: 6 min.



Ingredients:

1 egg
1 piece of bread, toasted & buttered
Sea salt and freshly cracked pepper, to taste

Directions:

Heat an inch of water in a small saucepan over medium high heat until boiling. Add the egg, reduce the heat to medium, and cover with a lid. Let the egg cook for 6 minutes then remove it from the stove. Side Note: if you are using a jumbo sized egg, cook for 6 minutes & 30 seconds. Run the saucepan and egg under cold water until the egg is cool enough to be handles. Using a knife, crack the top edge of the egg then gently peel, making sure to be careful so you don’t puncture the egg. Once it is peeled, place on a piece of buttered toast, slice down the center with a knife, season with sea salt and freshly cracked pepper, to taste then dig in. Enjoy!



Recipe and photos by For the Love of Cooking.net

References

  1. ^ Print Recipe (www.gordon-ramsay-recipe.com)
  2. ^ Save to ZipList Recipe Box (www.gordon-ramsay-recipe.com)

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