Tag: starchy

Twice Baked Potatoes – They Take Longer, But At Least They’re More Complicated

I don’t do a lot of things in the kitchen purely for
esthetic reasons, but these twice baked potatoes are one of my more beautiful
exceptions to that rule. You can get almost the exact same flavors by just
adding stuff to a regular baked potato, but what you won’t get in that
scenario is the impressive, over-stuffed height, and gorgeous, golden-browned
crust seen here.


Is it worth it? Only you can answer that. For me, once in a
while, for those extra fancy dinners, the answer is a resounding yes. Taste is,
and always will be, the most important aspect of cooking, but when entertaining
guests on special occasions, don’t forget that you’re putting on a
show with the food. And when it comes to starchy side dishes, this is a great
way to express that flair for the dramatic.

Like I said in the video, this is a demonstration of
technique, and not necessarily a recipe I want you to follow verbatim. I will
list what I used below, since I’m required to by food blogger common law, but if there was ever a
recipe that you’d want to experiment with, this is the one.

By the way, since theres a certain amount of prep involved
here, you can make these ahead of time, up to the point of the second baking,
and then just finish when it gets closer to service. I hope you give this show
stopping side dish a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 4 Twice Baked Potatoes:
4 large russet potatoes
3 tbsp butter
1 or 2 tbsp minced green onion
salt, pepper, cayenne to taste
1/2 cup shredded white cheddar cheese
1/2 cup cream or milk
1 egg yolk
Bake at 400 degrees F. for an hour to cook potatoes, and
then 20-30 to brown after stuffing.

Mash potato

Goodtoknow TV

Free & easy recipe video: Watch new how-to recipe videos with goodtoknow and Woman’s Weekly see all videos >

The golden rule for making perfect mash is to choose the right variety of potatoes. Usually called floury potatoes they have a drier more starchy flesh which after boiling will produce a lovely fluffy mash. Some of the most popular floury potatoes are Desiree, Maris Piper and King Edwards. It’s also essential not to overcook the potatoes or they will become water logged – if this does happen return the drained potatoes to the pan and heat very gently, shaking the pan occasionally until the excess moisture has evaporated.

  • Serves: 4

  • Prep time: 10 mins

  • Cooking time: 15 mins

  • Total time: 25 mins

  • Skill level: Easy peasy

  • Costs: Cheap as chips

That’s goodtoknow

Flavour your basic mash with grated cheese, smooth or wholegrain mustard, horseradish sauce or soured cream, if you like.

Ingredients

  • 900g floury potatoes, peeled
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 50g butter
  • 2-4tbsp hot milk

Method

  1. Cut the peeled potatoes into even-sized chunks and cook in a large pan of salted boiling water for 10-15 mins until just tender. Drain the potatoes into a large colander and leave for 3-4 mins.
  2. Return the potatoes to the pan with the butter and 2 tbsp of the hot milk. Mash thoroughly until smooth, adding a little more hot milk for a softer mash. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

By Nichola Palmer

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Nutritional information

Guideline Daily Amount for 2,000 calories per day are: 70g fat, 20g saturated fat, 90g sugar, 6g salt.

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Brussels Sprouts with Warm Bacon Dressing and the Holiday Side Dish Dilemma

As I enjoyed this very tasty Brussels sprouts with warm
bacon dressing recipe, I was reminded Thanksgiving side dish decision time is
rapidly approaching. It’s that annual dilemma where we’re forced to choose five
or six recipes among hundreds of potentially awesome options.


What makes this decision so tough is that you want things
that are traditional and comforting, but at the same time, want to keep the
menu fresh and interesting. You love those buttery mashed potatoes, and yet
you’ve wanted to make twice-baked potatoes for years. You always make Grandma’s
chestnut stuffing, but that spicy cornbread version you saw on Pinterest sure
looks amazing. What do you do?

Do what I do; keep the starchy cornerstones classic, and
switch up the vegetable sides instead. Go ahead and do your favorite and
familiar potato, stuffing, and gravy recipe; but when it comes to tired old
dishes like green bean casserole, or peas and carrots, let your freak flag fly.

As long as you have a few comfort food favorites around,
people will forgive a little experimentation, and this creative, un-cooked
Brussels sprouts recipe would fit the bill. I love the contrast between the
raw, crunchy vegetable and the rich, smoky, sweet and sour dressing. This would
do any turkey proud.


While I decided to go raw this time, you can certainly turn
this into a hot side by giving it a quick, stir-fry in a large skillet. Just a
minute or two, until it starts to wilt, and you’re good to go. Anyway, I’m not
sure if I made your side dish selection simpler or more complicated by showing
you this new and exciting offering, but I’m sure you’ll figure it out. You
always do. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 4-6 servings:
1 1/4 pound Brussels sprouts (will make about 1 lb. trimmed
and sliced)
1 tbsp vegetable oil
4 oz bacon, sliced
2 tbsp brown sugar
1/3 cup cider vinegar
1 lemon juiced
salt and pepper to taste
pinch of cayenne

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