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Pumpkin Cookies with Browned Butter Icing

Pumpkin Cookies with Browned Butter Icing

by Pam on November 25, 2012

Seriously – these cookies are SO AMAZING! We were invited to a friend’s house for a post Thanksgiving turkey dinner and I was in charge of dessert. I found a recipe for these cookies on Cooking Classy’s[1] site and couldn’t wait to try them out.  Not only did the pumpkin cookies sound tasty but the browned butter frosting really had me intrigued.  The cookies turned out to be soft which was a perfect combination with the flavorful and sweet icing.  I loved, loved, loved the flavor the browned butter gave to this icing- it was SO GOOD!  Make these cookies and I bet you won’t regret it.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, and clove in a bowl until mixed thoroughly  set aside. Using a mixer set on medium speed, whip together butter, brown sugar, and white sugar until pale and fluffy, about 3 – 4 minutes. Add in egg, mixing after the addition until combined. Mix in the sour cream, vanilla extract,  and pumpkin puree then mix well. Slowly add dry ingredients and mix until combined.

Transfer the cookie dough to a zip lock bag then cut the tip and pipe 1 1/2-inch rounds onto a nonstick or  Silpat lined cookie sheet, spacing cookies at least 1 inch apart.

Bake in the oven for about 12 minutes until tops spring back when touched. Allow to cool several minutes on baking sheet before transferring to a wire rack.

Prepare the browned butter icing. Measure the powdered sugar into a mixing bowl, set aside. Brown butter in a small saucepan over medium heat, swirling pan occasionally.  Remove from heat when the golden brown flecks begin to appear in the center of the foamy bubbles.  Carefully pour browned butter over powdered sugar in mixing bowl, use a rubber spatula to scrape any excess butter and browned bits from pan. Add the half and half and stir mixture until smooth and creamy. Spread over cookies with a spoon.  Add extra half and half, about 1 – 2 tsp at a time, to icing mixture to thin because it will thicken as it sits.  

Store in an airtight container in a single layer in refrigerator and rest at room temperature before serving.



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Pumpkin Cookies with Browned Butter Icing




Yield: 14 large cookies

Prep Time: 15 min.

Cook Time: 10-12 min

Total Time: 30 min.



Ingredients:

Pumpkin Cookies:

1 1/3 cup plus 1 tbsp flour
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
3/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
1/4 tsp ground cloves
6 tbsp unsalted butter, softened
3/4 cups packed light-brown sugar
6 tbsp white sugar
1 large egg
1/4 cup sour cream
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
3/4 cups canned pumpkin puree
1 recipe Browned Butter Icing, recipe follows

Browned Butter Icing:

2 cups powdered sugar
5 tbsp unsalted butter
2 1/2 tbsp half and half
1/2 tsp vanilla

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, and clove in a bowl until mixed thoroughly set aside. Using a mixer set on medium speed, whip together butter, brown sugar, and white sugar until pale and fluffy, about 3 – 4 minutes. Add in egg, mixing after the addition until combined. Mix in the sour cream, vanilla extract, and pumpkin puree then mix well. Slowly add dry ingredients and mix until combined.

Transfer the cookie dough to a zip lock bag then cut the tip and pipe 1 1/2-inch rounds onto a nonstick or Silpat lined cookie sheet, spacing cookies at least 1 inch apart. Bake in the oven for about 12 minutes until tops spring back when touched. Allow to cool several minutes on baking sheet before transferring to a wire rack.

Prepare the browned butter icing. Measure the powdered sugar into a mixing bowl, set aside. Brown butter in a small saucepan over medium heat, swirling pan occasionally. Remove from heat when the golden brown flecks begin to appear in the center of the foamy bubbles. Carefully pour browned butter over powdered sugar in mixing bowl, use a rubber spatula to scrape any excess butter and browned bits from pan. Add the half and half and stir mixture until smooth and creamy. Spread over cookies with a spoon. Add extra half and half, about 1 – 2 tsp at a time, to icing mixture to thin because it will thicken as it sits. Side Note: The icing is very sweet so don’t put it on too thick.
Store in an airtight container in a single layer in refrigerator and rest at room temperature before serving.



Adapted recipe and photos by For the Love of Cooking.net
Original recipe by Cooking Classy

References

  1. ^ Cooking Classy’s (cookingclassy.blogspot.com)
  2. ^ Print Recipe (www.gordon-ramsay-recipe.com)
  3. ^ Save to ZipList Recipe Box (www.gordon-ramsay-recipe.com)

Baked spiced chicken with pomegranate

Goodtoknow TV

Free & easy recipe video: Watch new how-to recipe videos with goodtoknow and Woman’s Weekly see all videos >

This combination of flavours, straight from the Middle East, helps transform humble chicken drumsticks into a special feast. The spice mix also works well brushed over lamb chops. These tender chicken drumsticks only take 40 mins to cook and are cheap to buy in comparison to other joints of chicken. Serve on a bed of rice cooked according to the packet instructions. The pomegranates in this recipe add a burst of sweet flavor to the chicken which is just delicious. The chicken is not too spicy so the kids will love it too.

  • Serves: 4

  • Prep time: 10 mins

  • Cooking time: 40 mins

  • Total time: 50 mins

  • Skill level: Easy peasy

  • Costs: Cheap as chips

That’s goodtoknow

Pomegranate molasses is a thick sweet/sour syrup made from pomegranate juice; it is used in many sweet and savoury Middle Eastern dishes. If unavailable, use 1tbsp lemon juice and 2tsp clear honey instead.

Ingredients

  • 1tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 2tsp pomegranate molasses
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2tbsp vegetable oil
  • 8 large chicken drumsticks
  • 2tbsp freshly chopped dill
  • Seeds from one pomegranate

Method

  1. Pre-heat oven to 200°C/400°F/Gas Mark 6. Put the spices and garlic in a small bowl and mix in the pomegranate molasses, plenty of seasoning and the oil. Mix to make a paste.
  2. Wash and pat dry the chicken and arrange in a shallow baking dish. Brush all over with the spicy oil and bake in the oven for about 40 mins until tender and cooked through. Drain well.
  3. To serve, serve the chicken over freshly cooked basmati rice flavoured with fried garlic cloves, and sprinkle with dill and pomegranate. Serve immediately.

By Kathryn Hawkins

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Nutritional information

Guideline Daily Amount for 2,000 calories per day are: 70g fat, 20g saturated fat, 90g sugar, 6g salt.

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Egg and potato pie

We have got a mouse.

I say that like this is a new thing. We’ve actually had a mouse for ages. And when I say mouse, I dearly hope I do mean mouse, singular, not mice, plural. It’s hard to tell, mice look similar. And if there are two mice living in this house, it’s highly likely they are related and therefore even more indistinguishable.

The reason I mention it only now is that up until a fortnight ago, only other people had ever seen this mouse and I, of course, dismissed the sightings as fanciful imaginings of hysterical people.

“Okay,” I would say, “if there’s a mouse, where’s the mouse poo?” But then one evening when my husband was watching football, I was sitting right here at the kitchen table, writing, and out from under the oven came a small, sleek mouse with a twitchy nose, beady eyes and very large ears.

It was indescribably cute.

Then it saw me and disappeared like lightning, leaving, in terror, a trail of poo behind it.

I didn’t say anything to my husband, because my husband thinks we should get Rentokil in and I do not want this. I do not want to set glue traps or lay down some sort of ghastly poison that causes the mice to die slowly from internal bleeding. Neither do I want to get a cat. I like cats, but there are too many cats already on our street already and they kill all the birds. I have never been ok with death. I don’t like it and I don’t want it around me. I certainly don’t want to be party to it.

I have purchased, online from somehere that calls itself “Tooled-Up” a humane mousetrap but when I catch and release this mouse on to Hampstead Heath I fully expect another one to replace it.

Anyway, aren’t mice inevitable? These old London houses with their mouse-sized gaps everywhere and rubbish aplenty – surely every building, except hermetically-sealed new builds, has got a mouse somewhere. Rather than issue a mouse holocaust, we should all just try to get along.

(Incidentally, my sister in law told me that she heard on the radio that there is an influx of mice at the moment because it has been so rainy – the mice flee the flooding sewers and take shelter under, for example, ovens in North London. She has the same attitude to mice as me: live and let live.)

Anyway I know why we have got a mouse. It’s because of Kitty. Or rather, it’s because of me. It’s because I allow her to roam freely round the ground floor carrying a variety of brittle foodstuffs, which rain little mouse-snack-sized crumbs hither and thither, which, later on, the mouse posts into its gob with both hands. I have seen it with my own eyes, while sitting on the sofa watching Breaking Bad and eating Green&Blacks.

The only thing to do is vacuum the entire ground floor every night before bed. I do not wish to starve the mouse, you understand – merely think that it might have better luck elsewhere until the sewers dry out and it can return to its natural habitat.

Speaking of natural habitats, mine is carbohydrate-based. I have been dieting like mad recently because I am still so traumatised by being fat while pregnant (yes, after 17 months. That’s how fat I was). But recently, I have fallen off the starvation waggon and have been scoffing like my little mouse friend. It’s partly because I am trying to have another baby and think maybe if I’ve got a bit more meat on my bones it might help.

Incidentally, I know what you’re thinking: you’re thinking – why are you trying to have another baby when all you do is complain on and on about how awful having children is? And my answer is this: Kitty needs a little buddy. If she didn’t need a little buddy I wouldn’t do it. No way. The thought of doing it all again makes me feel quite ill but at least I only have to do it once more. Then I can wash my hands of the whole sorry business and concentrate on dieting until I’m so thin a stiff breeze would blow me over.

But until then, here is a terrific recipe for egg and potato pie that my husband makes when we’re feeling skinny and virtuous enough to risk letting such things pass our lips.

Giles’s egg and potato pie
for 4

3 large floury potatoes
4 eggs
butter – about 100g
salt and pepper

1 Peel and boil the potatoes whole for 15 minutes but stop boiling if they look like they’re falling apart, as floury potatoes are so wont to do. Boil the eggs for 7 minutes, cool and peel.

2 Slice the potatoes and the eggs. This is a reasonably fiddly job – especially with the eggs. If you have a purpose-made egg slicer, this is the time to extract it from the back of that drawer, wipe the grease off and deploy it.

3 Butter the bottom of a baking dish, then cover with a layer of potatoes. Dot with butter and season. Then add a layer of sliced egg. Repeat this until you have used up all your egg and potato.

DO NOT fret if this all looks a bit of a mess, it is an imprecise dish and will taste terrific no matter how it looks.

4 Put in the oven for 45 mins at 180